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Equipment Types

On this page are a few examples of the types of equipment issued by the Posture and Mobility Service.

When we select our range we look at:

  • Safety - for the user, carers and the public.
  • Durability - how long we expect it to last under normal operating conditions.
  • Clinical Evidence - how many other people are using it, and what are their experiences?
  • Re-usability - when it is returned to us, what is the likelihood we will be able to make it "as new" and reissue?
  • Postural benefit - will it help people with postural and pressure issues?
  • Value - are alternatives available which will do the same job for less?
  • Ease of use - is the equipment simple enough to use, and are the instructions easy to follow?  How much instruction is required?

When we assess someone, we will work with the person to identify which equipment best meets their needs, and which they can safely use to its best potential.  Issue of accessories is related to clinical need also.  We will always try to avoid over-prescription, as it decreases value for money in the services we provide, and can in some cases inhibit the functionality and clinical benefit of the base equipment.

We will only issue equipment where there is an essential posture or mobility need.  In some cases this may be different to what was expected, or we may refuse to issue equipment on safety grounds.  We will explain our reasons in these cases.

Cushions

Wheelchair cushions are prescribed according to clinical need.  Many people do not need one at all.  Cushions vary in range from simple foam cushions which can be issued from information given by the referrer, to bespoke prescription items and moulded seating systems which may be issued following assessment.

Paediatric Buggy

  • Usually used for younger children without complex postural needs, but who are not able to mobilise independently.
  • Accessories - some models can be adapted or have modifications, which must be associated with an identified clinical need.

 

Paediatric Manual Wheelchair

  • Available in Self-Propel (big rear wheels, usually operated by the child) and Transit (small rear wheels, assisted by the carer) configurations.
  • Usually for children who are too old for a buggy.
  • Often used to help manage postural needs.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.         

 

Paediatric Powered Wheelchair

  • Often for children with complex postural need, who cannot self-propel.
  • Can be used to help children gain a better level of independence.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.

 

Standard Transit Wheelchair

  • For people with a low postural need who cannot self-propel.
  • Often issued when an assessment is not needed.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.  Some models can accommodate amputee kits.

 

Standard Self-Propelled Wheelchair

  • For adults with a low postural need who can self-propel.
  • Often issued when an assessment is not needed.
  • Supplied with quick-release wheels for ease of transport.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.  Some models can accommodate amputee kits.

 

Lightweight Self-Propelled Wheelchair

  • For people who need to spend most of their time in a wheelchair, who can self-propel.
  • High level of physical and cognitive skill needed.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.  Some models can accommodate amputee kits.

 

Indoor/Outdoor Powered Wheelchair

  • Can be used indoors oroutdoors.
  • Driving test needed to use outdoors.
  • Restrictions on environment and speed to ensure safe operation.
  • Powered chairs do not fold up.
  • Common Accessories - cushions, trays, armrest options, oxygen bottle carriers according to clinical / sociological need.  Some models can accommodate amputee kits.

 

If you already have a wheelchair or buggy, you should have been supplied with a User Instruction Manual.  If you do not have one, please let us know and we will send one out to you.

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